Call for papers, SI History of the Family: Sibship size and the height of children

Dear colleagues,

I am preparing a special issue in History of the Family on the association between sibship size and height. Please see the attached invitation for details.

A declaration of interest together with a one-page abstract should be sent to me no later than March 31, 2015.The complete papers should be sent no later than August 31, 2015.

Please, feel free to pass the invitation on to anyone who might be interested.

All the best
Stefan Öberg
Researcher, Unit for Economic History

University of Gothenburg
stefan.oberg@econhist.gu.se

Call for papers for a special issue/section in the journal History of the Family on the associations between sibling configuration and anthropometric measures of well-being.

Children with many siblings have often been shown to have worse life chances, and also shorter stature, than children with fewer siblings. By combining micro-level demographic data with anthropometric data it is possible to get an insight into living conditions in families in different contexts, historical and contemporary. Using this approach we can learn about the consequences of large families and the causes behind the worse life chances of children in large families. The extent the association between sibship size and height of the children is universal across contexts and time has consequences for both our understanding of family behavior and historical societal changes.

Research on the influence from family size on the life chances of the children most often shows that children with many siblings are worse-off than children with fewer siblings (e.g. Dribe, Van Bavel and Campbell 2012). There are several theories on how this influences behaviors and shape societal changes, even the fertility decline (e.g. Ariès 1980; Becker 1991; Galor 2012). By using anthropometric measures of well-being, such as height, on the children it is possible to get insights into the living conditions in families with different numbers of children (e.g. Hatton and Martin 2010). Longitudinal studies of how the number of siblings in the family affected the lives of the children can contribute to our understanding of how families were affected by, for example, industrialization (Bras, Kok and Mandemakers 2010). Longitudinal studies combining micro-level demographic data with anthropometric measures can provide insights into how the conditions of families and children changed over time (Öberg 2015).

In this special issue/section we aim to present studies of this association in a wide range of contexts and times. This could contribute substantially to both our understanding of the association in and by itself but also of how living standards in large families varied between contexts and developed over time.

Time schedule:
A declaration of interest together with a one-page abstract should be sent to Stefan Öberg,stefan.oberg@econhist.gu.se, no later than March 31, 2015.

The complete papers should be sent no later than August 31, 2015.